• Guest Book

    IMG_6601Some guests think that our guestbook is an odd tradition. They politely sign it, commenting that it “must be a British thing,” or some other remark that lets us know that this is weird for them. Others think it’s great, and flip back through the pages to see if they know anyone else, reading comments from previous guests.

    The guestbook is something we started years ago, and it has helped us be better hosts. Here are a few ways it has helped our hospitality—three reasons that you might want to start your own. Continue reading

  • Trusting Your Wise and Generous Father

    Petronia_xanthocollis_at_BharatpurIn the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus teaches us about our heavenly Father. He describes the birds of the air, telling us that our heavenly Father feeds them, and aren’t we of more value than they are? In Matthew 6:32, after describing the pressures of our human need to obtain food, drink, and clothing, he reminds us that our heavenly Father knows that we need all these things. In Matthew 7:11, reflecting on prayer using the illustration of a child asking a father for food and receiving what is good, he says, “how much more will you Father who is in heaven give good things to those who ask him!” Jesus tenderly and lovingly points us, and the crowds hearing him, to God the Father’s great care and love for his people. Continue reading

  • What Churches Can Learn From Jane Austen

    CassandraAusten-JaneAusten(c.1810)_hiresDon’t worry – it’s not soteriology or anything. There is no evidence that Jane Austen possessed saving faith, so taking theological tips from her doesn’t make sense.

    But as a brilliant novelist, she understood people. Society might be different now than it was two hundred years ago: human nature is the same. And it’s Austen’s keen insight into people’s thought and behavior patterns that leave lessons for pastors, congregations, and individual members in our churches today. Here is one lesson from each of her three best-loved novels. Continue reading

  • Searching for Adam?

    What is the root of our existence? Was there an Adam and Eve? Is their world a lost world, just beginning to be recovered?

    How we answer these questions has vast implications for our theology and practice of life. It defines who we are, what God has done, and who God is. The gospel is connected to Genesis: there is the first Adam and the second Adam. Christ, the Eternal Son was intimately involved in the creative origin of humanity: “for by him all things were created… all things were created through him and for him.” (Colossians 1:16) Continue reading